Category Archives: Asthma

First new dry powder inhaler for quick relief!

At first glance, I thought to myself, do we really need another quick acting inhaler?  As I thought about inhaler technique and how we use our Ventolin MDI’s, most of use suck on the end of the inhaler which is the wrong technique to use.  (all of the medication deposits on the back of the throat)  Why not use the appropriate inhaler that’s meant to actuate with your breath anyway?  ie, sucking on the inhaler is what you’re supposed to do!

Give the dry powder a try!
Give the dry powder a try!

Here’s the link to the article if interested–http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/15-04-01/FDA_OK_for_Teva_s_acute_asthma_inhaler.aspx

Is Milk Allergy Desensitization Ready for Prime Time?

This article is in press and will be published in Annals from the College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology next month.  I thought the study is very interesting given the “push” for oral desensitization.  I just returned from the AAAAI annual meeting and it appears that patients with food allergy can become “desensitized” or cured, however, that comes with a cost of potential anaphylaxis during treatment.  Think of it like the use of allergy shots which are very effective, but you can develop anaphylaxis after an allergy shot that will need additional treatment such as epinephrine.  The question I have is, “should this therapy with foods be used at home where parents and patients don’t know much about giving epi?” 

milk

Here’s the summary–>Asthma patients are at risk for more severe reactions and less likely to reach full desensitization during milk oral immunotherapy, according to a study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Researchers in Israel studied 194 subjects 6 years and older with IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy, with and without asthma, undergoing milk oral immunotherapy. Regardless of severity, subjects with asthma had more reactions and injectable epinephrine use during induction, and more home treatments with immunotherapy. Moderate to severe asthma also was associated with a lower likelihood of reaching full desensitization

I inhale animals

We all know the cost and hassle of taking care of asthma, especially for children.  And yes, we’ve tried many different methods to get kids to use their inhalers at all, much less to get them to use their inhalers correctly.

AT least it's fun for kids!
AT least it’s fun for kids!

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/funhaler-mdi-asthma-inhaler-case-for-children-prototype

Dealing with Problems by Self-Medicating

lynnawiensmd:

Couldn’t say it better for allergy & asthma meds!

Originally posted on 123MyMD:

Dealing with Problems by Self-Medicating

How many of us try to self-medicate ourselves. We might do it with alcohol; we might do it with drugs; we may do it with over-the-counter medications; we may do it with caffeine. All sorts of things are used to self-medicate. What you have to look at is what problem are you dealing with, and how are you trying to handle it? Self-medication is not a bad thing if you’re taking a cough medicine for a cold. But if you’re trying to grapple with something that’s beyond your skill, you need to get help. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor and get that advice.

For more information, please go to http://www.123MyMD.com.

View original

Running with asthma

lynnawiensmd:

Keep up the good work! No excuse for not exercising.

Originally posted on lissyruns:

I’ve had asthma for as long as I can remember. I can also remember as a child being told that it was likely that I’d just ‘grow out of it’. But I got older and older, and now here I am at 26, still an asthmatic.

Like most people, I have certain triggers that make asthma worse. The biggest trigger I have is cold weather. Asthma is a major problem for me in winter – the cold air coupled with spending more time indoors with central heating on full blast plays havoc with my ability to breathe comfortably. 

It makes training so much harder – the running in general is harder, with inhaler breaks mid run. Harder runs in turn lead to dreading runs, which in turn leads to missed runs. It’s a vicious cycle.

I remember once being at a BBQ, and getting out and using my inhaler. Bemused…

View original 522 more words

Is it legal to buy drugs online or import them from another country?

lynnawiensmd:

Many asthma patients will inquire about this for cheaper inhalers. Good article.

Originally posted on PharmacistAnswers:

Is It Legal To Buy Drugs Online Or From Outside Of The United States?

     ​Consumers always want to find the best price to purchase their goods and medications are no different. The drugs that treat our many illnesses and disease states can help us lead healthier and better lives, but they can also come at an enormous cost. We now live in a digital age, where many of our purchases that once took place in brick and mortar stores, now take place online. There has always been a sort of stigma regarding online pharmacies. Are their prices too good to be true? Are they safe? Will you get the same medication online as the medication that is at your CVS down the street? The big questions though are those concerned with the legality of it all. There are two legal questions that people always want answered. The first is if it is even legal to buy drugs online. The second is, if it is legal to buy drugs online, can…

View original 842 more words

Asthma Triggers!

lynnawiensmd:

Ah yes! Triggers are what make asthma so unpredictable.

Originally posted on More Than A Mom:

If you have asthma, certain things can cause you to have an asthma attack. These triggers include things like cigarette smoke, pollen or air pollution, cold air, mold, animals, and dust. To help control your asthma, stay clear of these triggers.

Also, learn how to spot the early signs of an asthma attack. When you know the signs, you can stay in control. Early signs can be different for each person, but here are common ones:
A long lasting cough
Chest tightness or discomfort
Becoming out of breath more easily than usual
Coughing
Frequent clearing of the throat
Wheezing
Stuffy nose

A written asthma action plan spells out how to use your drugs. If you don’t have a written asthma action plan, ask your doctor for one.

Remember: If you don’t have a written asthma action plan, ask your doctor for one.

If you have a certain topic or question…

View original 37 more words

Bronchial thermoplasty: Long-term safety and effectiveness in patients with severe persistent asthma

The research is now there for use of bronchial thermoplasty.  What is this procedure?

We have this procedure available here in Tulsa at St Francis hospital.  Do patients like it?

For the study in this month’s JACI that summarizes the beneficial effects of bronchial thermoplasty, click on the link below:

Bronchial thermoplasty: Long-term safety and effectiveness in patients with severe persistent asthma.

Health: Asthma Misdiagnosis Is Common

lynnawiensmd:

Don’t think you have asthma….try the following:
1. Reflux can mimic symptoms of asthma with cough & wheeze
2. You might need a Aridol challenge test to be sure.
3. Don’t forget about sinus infection which can mimic coughing.
4. Make sure you’ve performed lung function! (PFTs)
5. Vocal Cord Dysfunction can sneak in as a cause of cough & wheeze.

Originally posted on CBS Philly:

[worldnow id=9641386 width=400 height=300 type=video]

By Stephanie Stahl

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — One in 12 people have been diagnosed with a breathing disorder and the numbers are growing every year.  But experts say many people are being misdiagnosed, and in some cases, the drugs they’re prescribed are doing more harm than good.  3 On Your Side Health Reporter Stephanie Stahl explains.

More than 25 million Americans have been diagnosed with asthma.  But experts say not all of those people actually have it.

“Patients are often misdiagnosed with asthma, much more often than anyone typically realized,” said Dr. Sally Wenzel, a Pulmonologist.  She says studies have shown 25 to 30 percent of asthma patients are misdiagnosed.

When Deb Bushe came to Dr. Wenzel for help with her asthma she learned she didn’t have it.

“I was very surprised when I was told I didn’t have asthma,” said Deb.  For 15 years Deb…

View original 160 more words

Oklahoma Drivers…Shut ’em Down.

Without a doubt, driving on ice and snow should be reserved for the experienced drivers only.  We don’t need more wrecks on Hwy 169 that what we already have to endure.  But when the forecast for a winter storm brings on a run for bread and milk, we may have gone a bit too far.  We have our own version of Black Friday…it’s called snow storm panic!  Here I was shopping at Target to get a few items I really did need.  Usually, my wait at the pharmacy is very short, but last night I guess EVERYONE thought it was important to get their medications filled before the storm arrived in case medications would no longer be available.  Come on, pharmacies stay open even in Minnesota.  Did you happen to go down the bread aisle?  Nothing left and not a snowflake on the ground.  No wonder you can’t yell fire in a theatre.  The most shocking behavior, however,  found in Oklahoma in preparation for a winter storm is to cancel school before it even starts to snow.  Will you catch us off guard and unprepared?  Not a chance.  No wonder our kids have never seen snow or had a chance to make those lovely snow angels.  They’re never in it.  All joking aside, we did have a pretty nasty snowstorm 2 years ago with almost 20 inches in one night.  That amount of snow shut the city of Tulsa down for a week!  Could it happen again?  Sure could, but the video below is enough for me:

Now, you’re probably wondering if I always pontificate about a totally irrelevant topic such as how Tulsans prepare for snow storms.  Fortunately, this can have some relevance to cold weather illness:

  1. Asthma can be a real problem during the cold weather.  Inhaling cold air causes drying of the airway wall and more severe bronchospasm that moderate temperatures.  Don’t think that coughing and shortness of breath is just cold air; it may be your asthma getting out of control.  Learn how to cover your nose and mouth with a scarf or mask, even if you’re outside for a short period of time.  And most of all, use your regular inhaler (controller) during the winter  months if cold air or upper respiratory infections are triggers for your asthma.
  2. Another problem with the winter season is trying to figure out if I have a cold, flu, sinus, or allergy problems.  Let me make this much easier for you.  Most ragweed is done pollinating by the end of October, so without much pollen in the air, your sneezing and coughing is probably not due to allergy (no exposure). A cold usually lasts < 1 week and any congestion or runny nose that doesn’t resolve from one Saturday to the next is probably a sinus infection.  Why does this matter?  Sinus infections should be treated with the “all or nothing” approach as any infection left in the sinuses will only result in more infection.  Catching the flu makes you feel terrible and you’re already coughing.  What could be worse?  Add a fever with muscle aches and your diagnosis is most likely some type of influenza.  Good motivation to get your flu shot!
  3. Am I Allergic to the Cold?   I’m glad you asked.  Cold-induced hives stays hidden for most of the year and comes out with a vengeance during cold weather.  Some instances can be life-threatening and this condition is nothing to take lightly.  Cold-induced urticaria of course, responds best to a vacation at Key West, but if you don’t have the luxury or flexibility to do that, antihistamines are still the backbone of treatment.  Be careful when shoveling snow as shortness of breath and chest tightness may be associated with hives and a cold-induced reaction.

Although you must be careful with cold weather illness, you have to do something outside or you’ll get cabin fever.  The link below is from AAAAI on how to control your asthma and still participate in winter activities.  It’s a good read in front of the fireplace with a cup of hot chocolate.  In the meantime, I’m heading for the slopes!

Asthma and Winter Sports.