All posts by lynnawiensmd

About lynnawiensmd

I’ve always wanted to be a doctor. My second grade teacher can tell you that; but you’re not here for a history lesson. My dream came true at the University of Kansas School of Medicine followed by training in Allergy/Immunology at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City. I will never be disappointed with the privilege of caring for patients, but it takes hard work and recommendations change. My passion is to understand the underlying “cause” of annoying symptoms such as sneezing, wheezing, not breathing through my nose, and generally not feeling up to my potential. This website will be used not only to share information about allergy, asthma, and recurrent infections, but I’ll put important educational material right at your fingertips–finally all in one place!

Everything you wanted to know about ragweed

http://www.allergyasthmanetwork.org/your-ragweed-pollen-primer/?utm_source=September+E-news+-+Severe+Asthma+and+OCS%3B+World+Lung+Day%3B+Teens+and+Asthma&utm_campaign=Sept+2018+E-news&utm_medium=email

Advertisements

Isn’t everyone allergic in Oklahoma? I’ve come to the right state

Don’t sneeze on me!

“When I fly across the state border into Oklahoma, I start #sneezing.”  “There must be something in Oklahoma that causes my eyes to itch and burn.”  “I felt fine on vacation in California, but now I’m miserable with #allergies!” Comments like this are common if you practice allergy in Oklahoma, but are they really true? Continue reading Isn’t everyone allergic in Oklahoma? I’ve come to the right state

Myth is, after all, the never ending story Part 2

When it comes to asthma, it’s not easy fighting the myths of Facebook, Google, or e-mail campaigns. And why are we so resistant to the diagnosis of asthma for our kids and ourselves? For asthma, if you don’t make the correct diagnosis, you’ll never implement the proper treatment. By that I mean, you’re not likely to use prevention, but instead will wait for an asthma attack and then rush in to treat the symptoms. Health care providers are responsible for this phenomenon just as much as patients. Go to any emergency room or urgent care with an asthma attack and you’re likely to receive steroids, antibiotics and the admonition to “see your primary care doctor”. The problem is that patients feel better after steroids and guess what? they never seek medical attention for the prevention of #asthma. After practicing asthma medicine for over 25 years, consider the following reasons for why our asthma treatment often fails to meet the “standard of care” according to published #asthma research:

  1.  Asthma attacks don’t happen all at once. If I can get through an asthma attack in September, what’s the big deal of one course of steroids per year? This paroxysmal nature of asthma makes proper treatment very difficult because we tend to have a very short memory about our last asthma attack. 
  2. As a general rule, we all resist preventive care. Do you miss a regular dental floss or exercise session? As difficult as it seems to continue with good preventive care, think how much more difficult it is to take an inhaler everyday to prevent asthma! Antibiotics are so successful after 10-14 days that we can stop therapy and recover back to our original health. Asthma isn’t the same disease process and many times one attack leads to never ending asthma.

Can I get over asthma? The short answer is usually not. Asthma is a disease of inflammation which means the airways over react to allergy, infections, or irritation. In short, this means lungs with asthma are forever inundated with “triggers” that cause wheezing, coughing, and typical asthma symptoms. If you don’t use preventive inhalers for the next attack, you can be assured it will come.

Myth is, after all, the never ending story.

Excuse my ranting and raving about myths in #allergy, but it’s true our minds need to “get in gear” for what we believe. Does it really make sense and does information we believe come from reliable sources? Let’s try and debunk a few myths about allergy while it’s fresh in your mind.

  1.  Once I start allergy shots, I’ll never have any problems. #Allergy immunotherapy or “allergy shots” are very helpful to relieve symptoms of #hay fever such as sneezing, runny nose and even wheezing, but they don’t cure everything. For instance, if you have sinusitis, don’t count on your shots to cure your symptoms–you have to treat the sinuses for relief. This may include antibiotics/prednisone for one month at a time, or even surgical intervention. This is the reason I will often obtain a CT scan of the sinuses before starting allergy shots–to make sure I’m not missing an infection or anatomical obstruction in the sinus cavities. You wouldn’t expect the patient below to improve with allergy shots because they have a concha bullosa on the left side causing obstruction of nasal airflow. Not a good remedy for allergy shots!
  2. Benadryl is the antihistamine of choice–pick an ER and you’re likely to find #benadryl used like candy. Medical conditions like #hives and unknown #allergic reactions should be treated with antihistamines, but benadryl, really? Better antihistamines are available OTC and include Zyrtec and Xyzal.  They’re stronger, more potent and last up to 24 hours instead of 4-6 hours like cousin benadryl. Next time you get benadryl, substitute with a better antihistamine and see what happens. (I think you’ll be pleased).
  3. Nasal spray addiction–Here in America, we don’t like using #nasal sprays. Europe has no problem sticking lots of objects up their nose, but in this country, we’d rather take a pill than use the more effective nose sprays. Every single study that compares nasal sprays with antihistamines, finds that nasal sprays such as corticosteroids work much better for allergies than pills and sometimes even allergy shots. WORD of CAUTION: Nasal sprays such as Afrin or 4-way spray can be addictive and harmful to your health. I’m only comparing nasal sprays with antihistamines and #topical steroids which don’t have addictive potential.
  4. There has to be a cause to my hivesperhaps the most frustrating medical condition of all time is #hives. That pesky rash that can range from a few bumps to your body being covered from head to toe with incredible itch associated with difficulty breathing and swelling. Most patients come in to the office hoping to find a cause or trigger to avoid and thus cure the hives. Unfortunately, the cause for hives is never found in 70% of cases, only leading to more frustration and disgust. I will usually look for allergy, bone marrow problems (tryptase) and alpha gal sensitivity, but that’s about it for finding a cause. Symptom control is key with antihistamines and Xolair, but if you stop your medication, the hives are likely to return. 

No, I’m not done with allergy myths, but part 2 is coming up later. Those topics to include the following:

  1. Can I get over asthma?
  2. Isn’t everyone allergic in Oklahoma? I’ve come to the right state;
  3. Food allergy–https://www.usatoday.com/videos/travel/experience/food-and-wine/2018/07/07/these-foods-can-help-you-feel-cool-heat/36661435/

If you don’t believe me, here’s an hour long lecture on “Allergy myths” given by Dr. Dave Stukus (teaches at Ohio State University) at the following link:

Something about numbers

I for one am tired  how my health score is tied to my existence as a person rather than who I really am.   “How to keep up your credit score, what income bracket I’m in, what’s my IQ” are nagging reminders that I may not be anything more than just a number and not a unique person on this planet. Health care is fast approaching this same pigeonhole similar to banks and retailers, but it’s not all bad. Ever heard of personalized medicine?

#Personalized medicine has some pretty awesome benefits on the horizon, but “what’s the catch?”  My cholesterol has to be below 120, cigarettes at zero, and my daily cups of coffee can’t be over 5 if I have any hope of living past 80;you just can’t get away from numbers.

According to Wikipedia, Personalized medicine, also termed precision medicine, is a medical procedure that separates patients into different groups—with medical decisions, practices, interventions and/or products being tailored to the individual patient based on their predicted response or risk of disease. So if numbers and health are an integral part of the future of health care, is there such a thing as an allergy or asthma number? Wouldn’t it be nice to find out which asthma inhaler is best for you based on “personalized medicine?” Or what if you suffer from chronic hives and can’t find the cause? Personalized medicine involves many more diseases that just asthma and allergy–just look at the link below, but I have a list as well. Continue reading Something about numbers

When You Just Can’t Fight It Anymore

I’m often asked about #immunodeficiency–does my body fight infection like it’s supposed to? Is this baby’s immune system normal? Obviously, probably not. Fortunately, #Stevens Johnson syndrome is quite rare, but antibody deficiency is NOT rare and many strategies can be performed to improve the situation.

example of Stevens Johnson syndrome

I often start the conversation about #immunodeficiency: “are you worried about how well you fight infection?” Since immunodeficiency comes in many flavors, there are no absolutes to checking the immune system, but here’s some pointers that are helpful. Remember, the body fights infection in compartments, so test for something in each compartment and you’ll hit a home run with the bases loaded.

Continue reading When You Just Can’t Fight It Anymore