Tag Archives: allergy shots

Four reasons I still practice Allergy in the Information Age

Ever notice how everyone has #allergies these days?  I kid you not, almost everyday, a patient will tell me that #Tulsa (where I practice) has more allergies than any other place in the country.  The irony of it all, is so did patients in Kansas, and patients say the same thing in Virginia and Texas.  You get my point–we all love to be known as the Allergy Capital of the World! Maybe it’s because allergies make us feel so miserable, and we love to hear stories about how to deal with the nemesis.  Or maybe we want some “inside information” to share with our friends & family who also suffer from allergy. Whatever the reason for our obsession with allergy, you can’t argue with the fact that good allergy advise is not only helpful for better quality of life, but it’s crucial in making sure that allergy sufferers avoid heeding the WRONG advice for treating #hay fever. This is the passion I experienced in order to complete a fellowship training in allergy– I wanted to be able to interact with patients about their #allergic symptoms on their journey to good health. But wait, why practice a specialty that has so much incorrect information on-line and no doubt, “everyone’s an expert in allergy” when you could be doing real medicine to treat someone’s heart attack? Here are four reasons I still practice allergy for your consideration: Continue reading Four reasons I still practice Allergy in the Information Age

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Dear Doctor…..

                             

Dear Doctor,

Thanks for all your help with my #allergies, but I have a bone to pick with you.  A few minutes into my visit and you’re talking about “rhinitis” and “IgE” and “desensitization”.  By the time my brain catches up with you, our visit is over and I don’t feel like I really understand what condition I  have.  Could you slow down and explain what you mean by all that medical riff-raff?

Signed,

Confused and a bit rushed Continue reading Dear Doctor…..

What Else About Allergy is Out There?

It’s difficult to find good material on the internet related to the practice of #allergy. Here is one such blog site: http://blogs.medscape.com/garystadtmauer.  This blog originates from New York and the practice website is http://www.cityallergy.com.  I will periodically post comments & articles from Dr. Stadtmauer’s blog and I’ve included one below about the coexistence of systemic allergy (that’s a positive skin or blood test) and LOCAL allergic rhinitis which has all the signs & symptoms of allergy, but guess what–skin & blood testing is all negative.  Very frustrating for #patients to experience allergy symptoms, but go in to their local allergist and find nothing. I wish treatment would be more satisfactory, but as you can imagine, it’s unknown what allergens to mix up for your allergy recipe if all testing is negative.  Continue reading What Else About Allergy is Out There?

It’s time for my shot!

It’s time for my allergy shot, but I don’t wanna!  If getting shots makes you nervous, watch this girl….a real trooper and funny at that:

Please review the following information on allergy shots…you’ll save some time and learn a lot. 

The only "bad" question is the one you didn't ask!

Questions patients ask:

1.  How often can I get shots? Once you are at the maintenance dose, you may receive shots every 2-4 weeks.  Please adjust your shots based on your allergy symptoms. (ie, shots every 2 weeks during the spring/fall and every 4 weeks during the winter)

2.  How long does it take to “build up?”  I’m glad you asked that.  You can build-up with weekly shots like we’ve always done it and take 4-6 months to reach the maintenance dose–conventional.  If you want to reach the maximum benefit earlier, I prefer the “rapid desensitization” which will achieve maintenance in one month.  Big difference in convenience!

3.  What to do about local reactions?  Don’t ignore them.  Local swelling doesn’t mean you will develop more severe reactions, but talk to your allergy shot nurse about air lock, application of ice, diluting your serum, just to name a few.  I want to know if your arm swells after your shots….the only bad question is–you get the hint. 

4.  Do shots really work?–I tell patients that after 3-5 years on allergy shots at high dilutions, 70 to 80% of patients don’t have to go back on injections.  What this means is that symptoms of allergy go down and need for medication also goes down, leaving you free to enjoy the outdoors! 

5.  Here’s what allergy serum should look like at the maintenance concentration–if your serum is clear, you may not be receiving the full benefit of shots in the first place. Notice the dark, cola-colored allergy serum…should be your maintenance if tolerated.

Here's what maintenance concentration of serum should look like!

Last but not least…..are shots safe long-term?  This study published in 2011 is very encouraging.  Association of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with incidence of autoimmune disease, ischemic heart disease, and mortality. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011.  Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. In this registry-based observational study, receiving SCIT (allergy shots) compared with medications only was associated with lower risk of autoimmune disease and heart disease, as well as decreased all-cause mortality (early death).

 Sooo….pull up your sleeve and let’s get you feeling better!

I'm getting my allergy shot....and still smiling!

For the last 100 years, the pioneering technique of subcutaneous allergen desensitization first developed by Noon and Freeman has proven quite resilient and, in fact, central to the practice of clinical allergy. It remains the only therapeutic modality by which long-term immune modification can be achieved and has afforded not only symptomatic relief to untold numbers of allergic patients, but also life-saving benefit in the case of venom hypersensitivity. So while we are indebted to generations of scientists and physicians for their outstanding contributions to the understanding of the mechanisms and clinical application of immunotherapy, we embrace the many new technological approaches that hold promise for the treatment of allergic patients and that perhaps one day may give rise to a cure for atopic diseases.