Fishing for allergy

Who doesn’t like to fish during this time of the year? Doesn’t matter if it’s catfish on the local pond, or trout at Roaring River, there’s nothing like feeling the tug on your line before you set the hook. And I have relatives that are experts at catching any type of fish you want. Fish allergy can be divided into 2 groups: the white fish and shellfish. You are usually not allergic to both groups and testing for sensitivity can be very helpful to avoid anaphylaxis and give you the tools to avoid the wrong kind of fish. Shellfish allergy to shrimp, crab, and lobster isn’t the focus of this writing, so we’ll discuss only allergy to “white fish” today. At times, I enjoy searching the medical literature for other allergist’s opinions on food allergy and this is no exception. What is most important for the white fish allergy, is can you outgrow this condition?

The data of whether someone can outgrow fish allergy is scarce. Fish allergy is one of the most common causes of food allergy, especially in children and young adults, with rates from 0.1 to 0.5%. The major fish allergen identified is beta-parvalbumin, it is resistant to heat and digestion. Many patients with an allergic reaction to one fish will also react upon ingestion of other fish. Sharks and rays mainly contain alpha-parvalbumin which has been shown to be less allergic.

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

Previous studies have shown that 15% of children can outgrow fish allergy within a period of 2-5 years, whereas telephone studies have shown it to be 3.5% in the United States.

A recent study called “Natural History of IgE-Mediated Fish Allergy in Children” published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immmunology: In Practice, aimed to describe the natural history of fish allergy.

Children in the study ranged from 4 to 18 years who were previously diagnosed with fish allergy. The results showed:

  • 22% of children tolerated all fish tested, the average timeframe was 8 years after their first reaction.
  • Complete tolerance to fish increased with age, from 3.4% in preschool children to over 45% in adolescents.
  • Most children were able to tolerate swordfish (94%) and tuna (95%).
  • The best predictor of fish allergy was the IgE test to cod greater than 4.87 kUA/L.

The study has shown that fish allergy in children starts early, mostly during the first 2 years of life and a considerable proportion of children will outgrow fish allergy.  Particularly those with less sever reactions and a lower level of sensitization (skin prick and IgE testing). Those who continue being allergic may still tolerate several fish species, such as tuna and swordfish. This probably is a reflection of their parvalbumin content and/or composition.

Tolerance to at least 1 fish can be important for allergic children because fish has beneficial effects on health owing to the high omega-3 content and it is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease.

  • So what’s the take away from fish allergy, so you can fantasize what the “big fish” is doing underwater before you set the hook?
  • Most children will outgrow fish allergy and this applies particularly to swordfish and tuna. A definite must is to have testing performed to determine the level of IgE (or skin testing) to white fish that will prevent an allergic reaction that can spoil your next great fishing trip.
  • Tolerating fish to include at least one species can have clinical benefit due to omega-3 content to reduce heart disease and stroke.

#allergy, #fish-allergy, #food-allergy

Four reasons I still practice Allergy in the Information Age

Ever notice how everyone has #allergies these days?  I kid you not, almost everyday, a patient will tell me that #Tulsa (where I practice) has more allergies than any other place in the country.  The irony of it all, is so did patients in Kansas, and patients say the same thing in Virginia and Texas.  You get my point–we all love to be known as the Allergy Capital of the World! Maybe it’s because allergies make us feel so miserable, and we love to hear stories about how to deal with the nemesis.  Or maybe we want some “inside information” to share with our friends & family who also suffer from allergy. Whatever the reason for our obsession with allergy, you can’t argue with the fact that good allergy advise is not only helpful for better quality of life, but it’s crucial in making sure that allergy sufferers avoid heeding the WRONG advice for treating #hay fever. This is the passion I experienced in order to complete a fellowship training in allergy– I wanted to be able to interact with patients about their #allergic symptoms on their journey to good health. But wait, why practice a specialty that has so much incorrect information on-line and no doubt, “everyone’s an expert in allergy” when you could be doing real medicine to treat someone’s heart attack? Here are four reasons I still practice allergy for your consideration: Continue reading

#aller, #allergic-rhinitis, #allergy, #allergy-blogs, #allergy-shots-2, #asthma

It’s allergy season and what can I do?

The following YouTube video describes a process called “Rush Immunotherapy” conducted in Ohio.  It’s now a more common way to deliver #allergy shots and reduces the total number of shots required to achieve clinical relief from your #allergies.  Some caveats about #RUSH Immunotherapy need to be included and your bullet list is below the video.

I would make the following corrections to this video:

1.  Unfortunately, you can’t answer all questions about immunotherapy (allergy shots) in a 3 minute news clip.

Continue reading

#allergen-immunotherapy, #allergy, #american-academy-of-allergy-asthma-and-immunology, #american-college-of-allergy-asthma-immunology, #oklahoma, #tulsa-oklahoma

Why See an Allergist?

Believe it or not the pollen season is just around the corner–6 weeks to be exact.

#allergy, #american-college-of-allergy-asthma-immunology, #childhood, #kids, #tulsa-oklahoma

USA Today just can’t stop talking about allergies!

Want to know how to improve your make-up skills during allergy season?  Look at this YouTube:

Here’s the article link. Early allergy in Tulsa! Look at Tulsa which is in the “high” range for this Spring’s pollen count!

#allergies, #allergy, #pollen, #tulsa-oklahoma

My Sinuses Suck!

Allergy or Irritant--that is the question!

Allergy or Irritant–that is the question!

Sinus pressure can be a real problem during the cold, winter months.  Do I take decongestants or antihistamines?  Sudafed or Zyrtec?  Are my allergies acting up?

Here are some pointers on dealing with sinus infections and sinus pressure with some really cool slides at the end:

  1. Most allergens are gone in December-January, so the statement “my allergies are bothering me” is actually misplaced.  You are meaning to say that sinus pressure is causing congestion and runny nose.  Inflammation and swelling definitely exist in your sinuses, it’s just that your symptoms during the winter are not caused by allergy, but rather sinus infection.
  2. Treatment of a sinus infection is “all or nothing”.  In other words, if you only remove 50% of the infection, it is likely your symptoms will quickly recur.  Your body requires a mucociliary blanket in the sinuses to gradually remove bacteria and excessive snot.  This protective blanket is destroyed during any infection, and won’t grow back until the inflammation subsides.  Often it takes 30 days of antibiotics and prednisone to restore the sinuses back to their original condition. 
  3. One of the pictures in your slide set (slide 3 of 15) shows what normal mucociliary blanket looks like under the microscope.  If this giant vacuum sweeper was operating normally all of the time, you wouldn’t have to use all your medication. 

Here are some suggestions on how to treat your sinuses better:

  1. Make sure you eliminate nasal congestion.  For the short term, use Afrin or similar equivalent (OTC) if you limit to < 1 week per month.  This allows the nasal airflow to drive away the excessive mucous in your nose which would otherwise become a great meal for hungry bacteria.  Sick but true!
  2. Find out if you have allergy!  The winter season gives you a reprieve from outdoor allergens, but during the spring, summer, and fall, tree pollen, Bermuda grass, and ragweed are more than willing to invade your sinuses and cause irreparable damage to your mucous membranes and make you always sick. 
  3. Use your prescribed nasal spray EVERYDAY as prescribed by your doctor.  I know, Americans hate to put anything in their nose (except your finger), but regular use of nasal steroids and antihistamines will reduce the swelling in your sinuses and guess what?  You got it, fewer infections. 
  4. Get smart!  Go through the slides below, and if you don’t learn anything new, I’ll buy your favorite drink at Starbucks. 

http://www.medicinenet.com/sinusitis_pictures_slideshow/article.htm

#allergy, #nasal-congestion, #paranasal-sinuses, #sinusitis

Contradictory skin test and ImmunoCAP results–which is better?

This question comes up in my office almost everyday….should I do skin testing or blood work?  As you can see from the response of national experts, it depends.  There is NO test that can boast 100% accuracy to predict whether or not you will react to a food.  In fact, the gold standard if you will, is still the oral food challenge.  Here is some food for thought (really, do you have to pun)

  1. Clinical history is very important in determining food allergy.  If you can eat a food without difficulty breathing, rash, or hives, you are most likely not allergic.  You may have a positive test, but that only means you’ve had previous exposure to the food.
  2. I will often obtain both skin testing and ImmunoCap (blood work) to clarify the presence of IgE-mediated allergy. If both tests are negative, you may have an adverse reaction to a food, not the severe life-threatening anaphylaxis.  Very important distinction!
  3. If in doubt, a food challenge is always a procedure to consider.  Here’s why.
  4. Sometimes the food in question just isn’t worth the trouble to challenge.  No one says you have to eat strawberries!
  5. If you challenge peanuts for example, in the doctor’s office and experience anaphylaxis, better there than at home.  Epinephrine is more readily available and in many cases, IV access and full resuscitation is available within minutes of your reaction. 
  6. This is another reason why a single test or treating allergy without experience is not a good idea.  Read the link below and tell me just how complicated things can become!

Contradictory skin test and ImmunoCAP results.

#allergy, #anaphylaxis, #food, #immunocap, #immunoglobulin-e

5 Tips for Dodging Frightful Food Allergies this Halloween

From the College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology–always a great source of support for allergy treatment.  Click on the link below BEFORE Halloween!Trick or Treat? (safely)

5 Tips for Dodging Frightful Food Allergies this Halloween.

#allergy, #food, #halloween

Put This Myth to Rest-(Dirt Jet Pro/SCRUBS hand sanitizer wipes)

Everyday I teach patients the difference between “allergy” and “irritant” reaction.  TV ads are overloaded with allergy advertisements in an attempt to sell antihistamines, so why wouldn’t you think that everyone has allergy of some kind.  The link below is a question about allergy (anaphylaxis in this case) to chemicals.  Consider the following:

  1. Adverse reactions to pollen, food, chemicals can be divided into “allergy” or “intolerance/irritants“.
  2. Allergy is defined as the production of IgE to the substance in question.  This is why you have positive skin tests and blood testing.  Why does this matter?
  3. You can only be “desensitized” to allergens, not chemicals.  IgE can be decreased and if you don’t have IgE to begin with you can’t delete its effect.
  4. The only treatment for irritants is to avoid them, regardless of whether the substance is a food or chemical.
  5. For chemical reactions or food intolerance, there’s not much to say except to stay away.  Click on the link below just to make sure!

Possible anaphylaxis to chemicals contained in cleaning agents (Dirt Jet Pro/SCRUBS hand sanitizer wipes).

#allergy, #anaphylaxis, #food-intolerance, #immunoglobulin-e

Tell Me Which Pain Meds I’m Allergic To!

It’s not unusual for a doctor to refer a patient to our allergy clinic to answer the question, “what pain medications am I allergic to?”  Surgery of any kind is a bit frightening, but add to that an adverse reaction to one of your pain medications and you know what hits the fan!  Reactions can include hives, difficulty breathing, headaches and a whole lot more.  So what can I do if I’m in a car accident or emergency surgery and I receive a pain medication I’m allergic to?  Will it kill me? 

Consider the following:

  1. Most effective pain meds are opioids and release histamine from the body when taken as pain meds.  We can’t skin test to medications in this category, so we rely on previous history.  That works well for the most part, but “there’s a first time for everything”
  2. The one exception to the above rule is fentanyl.  With this medication, skin testing and treatment for tolerance have been published and offer a good alternative.
  3. Often a procedure called “drug provocation testing (DPT)” is necessary to determine what you can and cannot take for pain medication.  Fortunately, most patients can tolerate the standard protocols used by most hospitals, so no need to worry.  If in doubt, DPT will give you VERY small amounts of medication making sure you can tolerate the drug before moving to a higher dose.  With a little patience & a long afternoon in the doctor’s office, we can usually find a medication that will work.
  4. But don’t take my word for it….the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology has several references on the subject of allergy to pain meds.  Check it out with the link below:

Prevention of allergic reactions in a patient scheduled for knee replacement who has a history of pain medication allergy and possible contact dermatitis to chromium.

#allergy, #analgesic, #surgery