Is This Really Corona virus? 

We’ve been so caught up with the #Coronavirus pandemic, that we’ve missed two important developments in the field of allergy:

  1.  The FDA has now approved the use of Palforzia for taking care of peanut allergy.  Guess when this was released? January 2020, about one month prior to the outbreak of COVID-19; the affect on our practice and most other medical clinics across the country was predictable. Nothing happened except to try and avoid COVID-19 as long as possible. Hopefully, our efforts will pay off, but the viral pandemic isn’t over yet, even though the panic has appeared to lessen.
  2. I won’t talk more about COVID-19 because many of us (including myself) are suffering from Corona fatigue and plenty of good information about COVID exists on YouTube channels such as MedCram and ZDoggBe prepared to devote some time to listen to these experts, because they won’t give you just a brief summary. They drill down to the ever evolving truth about COVID-19. (definitely worth your time)
  3. Back to the peanut story. #Palforzia is designed to give minute (very small) powder of peanut protein a little bit at a time so you don’t develop anaphylaxis with every ingestion. The company making this product spent large amounts of money to train professionals such as allergists with Zoom! conferences and field representatives to make sure we launched the program of desensitization without a hitch. Then came Coronavirus and knocked that one out of the park. So where does that leave us:
  4. Palforzia or peanut desensitization still works and is available to those patients who make good candidates. And who wouldn’t be a good candidate?
  5. Palforzia is associated with some risk and a consultation just to focus on this new treatment is required before starting the process.  Can you believe, patients have to pass a certification as well?
  6. For more information, call our office at 918-495-2636 to schedule a consultation for peanut desensitization.

FDA Gives OK to Peanut Allergy Oral Immunotherapy

What else did we miss because of COVID-19?

IT’S THE SPRING POLLEN SEASON!

In years past, everyone lived their life (or especially free time) outdoors because we live in Tulsa for the Spring & Fall, right? Well, this year, it was hard to live outside when you’re quarantined. Hopefully, you avoided exposure to the Coronavirus, but you also avoided exposure to the outdoor Spring allergens (good for you). What you’ll find when we relax the “stay-at-home” rules is more sneezing, runny nose, and typical allergy symptoms. Just a great case in point at how exposure really plays a significant role in your allergy symptoms. So don’t make fun of me when I tell you to cover your mattress and pillows with a substance that isolates the dust mites! Let’s review how allergies work, because a “pollen grain” and IgE look a lot like COVID-19. the video below is a pollen grain that attaches to IgE and the process of “allergy” begins. Notice that whatever process happens in the body occurs because a receptor (suction cup on the cell) binds to a virus or IgE. Every reaction (both good and bad) happens because of this union between body cells and external molecules. Listen to the video below to see how this actually works–and BTW, infection with COVID-19 works the same way.

So how do I tell if I’m having allergy or a nasty virus?

  1. As is usual for me, I like to give you academic information on topics that I really want you to understand–don’t just take my word for it. Too many hits come up searching for “corona virus or allergy,” so I will make it simple and give you the best video to watch.
  2. Patients with allergy are always sneezing and coughing, and many stories this year involve allergy patients who were suspected of having “the virus”. One patient said, “the isle cleared at Wal-Mart when I sneezed”. Another patient found she was ostracized at a friendly get together because of her runny nose and cough–it wasn’t Corona, only spring allergies. She told me later, that she felt embarrassed and wanted to leave the party immediately. You shouldn’t have to experience this rejection and embarrassment if you know what separates virus (any type) from allergy.
  3. Viral infections will often have fever, sore muscles/joints, and in the case of COVID-19, significant shortness of breath. Most likely, this is your first experience with rhinitis, whereas allergy patients have sneezing, coughing, and runny nose year after year.
  4. If you have any questions, please ask your doctor if you need further testing. Testing for both allergies and viral infections (not just Corona) are readily available and you should take advantage of knowing how best to treat your symptoms by correctly diagnosing your problem. Now, don’t show up at your allergists’ office if you think you have COVID-19 before calling first! Don’t take my word alone, watch the video from Dr. Skoner at West Virginia — 3 minutes long and will give you the peace of mind to know “is this allergy or virus.” Your health depends on it!

 

#allergy-symptoms, #asthma, #tulsa-oklahoma

New medications for Asthma–are we at the end of the line?

Watch my FOX 23 interview about new asthma meds

Jane (fictitious name, of course because of HIPPA regulations) is now 56 years old and just last year was diagnosed with #asthma. She thought, “no big deal, there are plenty of inhalers for me to use so I don’t wheeze”.  Little did she know that 2019 would put her in the hospital 3 times and multiple visits to the emergency room because of asthma. In fact, she even missed her grandson’s graduation from kindergarten because of her asthma. Now if that doesn’t motivate you, nothing will! Continue reading

#allergies, #tulsa-oklahoma

Myth-busters in Medicine

As an allergist  in Tulsa, the myths that surround asthma, food allergy, hives, hay fever abound and patients often come in to the office telling ME what they are allergic to or how to fix the problem. Let me give you some examples:

Continue reading

#allergies, #asthma, #board-certified-allergist, #dave-stukus, #food-allergy, #lynn-wiens, #tulsa-oklahoma, #zdogg

Give Me Your Stories About Food Allergy

Several months ago, I asked you what was missing from your treatment of #allergy.  To my surprise, 50% of respondents wanted more information on food allergy, compared to only 36% who wanted cheaper medications for their #asthma. So I listened and here are some stories I find interesting about food allergy. Please share your stories with me by adding your comments at the end of this blog. Unfortunately, people don’t really think food allergy is a real health problem. Continue reading

#american-academy-of-allergy-asthma-and-immunology, #food-allergy, #food-and-drug-administration, #tulsa-oklahoma

The Hidden Gem

Tulsa has often been chided as the “Oklahoma step child” in comparison to Oklahoma City, but I think this article refutes that myth.

Tulsa is on the listhttp://www.medscape.com/features/slideshow/best-places-to-practice-2015?src=wnl_edit_specol&uac=45399FY#page=4

#Oklahoma boasts a low cost of living, and #physicians responding to the Medscape survey also reported high incomes: an average of $304,000. At 8.5%, the average state and local tax burden is well below the national average of 9.8%.

Oklahoma doctors may have trouble finding adequate staff support. Continue reading

#community, #tulsa-oklahoma

It’s allergy season and what can I do?

The following YouTube video describes a process called “Rush Immunotherapy” conducted in Ohio.  It’s now a more common way to deliver #allergy shots and reduces the total number of shots required to achieve clinical relief from your #allergies.  Some caveats about #RUSH Immunotherapy need to be included and your bullet list is below the video.

I would make the following corrections to this video:

1.  Unfortunately, you can’t answer all questions about immunotherapy (allergy shots) in a 3 minute news clip.

Continue reading

#allergen-immunotherapy, #allergy, #american-academy-of-allergy-asthma-and-immunology, #american-college-of-allergy-asthma-immunology, #oklahoma, #tulsa-oklahoma

Why See an Allergist?

Believe it or not the pollen season is just around the corner–6 weeks to be exact.

#allergy, #american-college-of-allergy-asthma-immunology, #childhood, #kids, #tulsa-oklahoma